Animating the Sea: Motion, Light and Eyes

Faculty: Ruth Hayes, M.F.A., and Pauline Yu, Ph.D.

Category

Sight Dependency

Many organisms respond to light levels — even a simple shadow could indicate shelter, their next meal, or a predator. The needs of the animal determines the development of the eye; many predators have complex eyes in order to identify specific prey. Other animals, like barreleye fish, have eyes that focus upwards to find and catch any food that floats above them. The mantis shrimp has even weirder sight — their compound eyes have several layers of light-sensing cells to create trinocular vision and perceive depth in a single eye. The animals in this category all depend on their sight in different ways.

Barreleye Fish (Macropinna microstoma)

by Miranda Gress   Macropinna microstoma, also known as the barreleye fish, is a fascinating deep sea fish that is found mostly off the coast of California and the North Pacific. Measuring at about six inches long when fully grown, these… Continue Reading →

Common Merganser (Mergus Merganser)

Isadora Colpo The common merganser belongs to the family anatidae, which includes ducks, geese, and swans, and within that, the subfamily anatinae (Delacour & Mayr, p 7). The anatinae subfamily molts twice a year and has sexual dimorphism in voice… Continue Reading →

Emperor and Little Blue Penguins (Aptenodytes forsteri) and (Eudyptula minor)

By: Jay White Most of the time when someone is asked to imagine a penguin, they could think of a very basic concept; black body, white belly, flipper-like wings, a funny little waddle, and the ability to slide on their… Continue Reading →

Great Blue Heron (Ardea herodias)

By Kaden Kohtala The Great Blue Heron, or Ardea herodias in the order Pelecaniformes, is a common sight across North America. The family it belongs to, Ardeidae, consists of herons, egrets, and bitterns (Youth, 2000). A. herodias is the largest… Continue Reading →

Octopus Light Sensing Apparatus

By Mary Paiten Madsen There are several key things that are fascinating about how octopuses see the world. Their eyes do not have corneas, relying on other features to protect and hold the iris in place. Despite being notorious for… Continue Reading →

Otariid and Phocid locomotion

            Living in the pacific northwest it is not uncommon to see a Harbor Seal (phoca vitulina) or California Sea Lion (zalophus californiaus) at some point in a residents life. However, it is just as common for these two to… Continue Reading →

The Barreleye Fish (Macropinna microstoma)

When living in a world of complete darkness, it’s crucial to develop a way to detect one’s surroundings in order to survive. Having the ability to find light in such an environment would be an advantage over an abundance of… Continue Reading →

The Peacock Mantis Shrimp (Odontdactylus scyllarus)

A vibrantly beautiful, and voracious visual predator, the peacock mantis shrimp (Odontdactylus scyllarus) strikes both fear and admiration into the hearts of those who may happen upon one. Appearing at first to be psychedelic lobsters equipped with boxing gloves, peacock… Continue Reading →

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