zeit·geist

ˈtsītˌɡīst,ˈzītˌɡīst/

noun

  1. the defining spirit or mood of a particular period of history as shown by the ideas and beliefs of the time.

 

The fault line

 

Deep, deep, under the earth, where time and space melt away into the heat of creation, the molten lava that pumps the core of our inner existence of a collective unisphere…

The creative forces of life effect us so deeply, profoundly, and in ways unwritten or spoken by any language… There geophysical connections to the land, space, and spirit, we have only discovered the tip of the iceberg to these connections.

One connection I will draw particular attention to is the geo physical and metaphysical connection to human history surrounding the Cascadia subduction zone, more specifically known as the Seattle Fault line. The Fault line was “officially” discovered by the use of LIDAR aerial radar technology that scans the surface of the earth for visual signs of fault lines. The fault line runs from underneath Bellview, right underneath Safeco Fields in Seattle, down Alkai Beach, right through the South end of Bainbridge Island, and downwards towards Bremerton.

Throughout history, this very defining line, this molten crack in the earth’s surface, has been a boundary line deep sliced in the history of the land and human inhabitants, and for the geological evolution and development of the entire area.

The oldest signs left behind by human inhabitants in this region were hieroglyphs left behind in the stone by the Suquamish Indians, depicting lines and swirls that resemble spirals. Ancient native folklore speaks of specific areas in this region, areas that align right along the fault line, that tribal shamans and leaders would go to hold ceremonies to have profound audible and visual hallucinations “ including wavy or parallel lines, nested curves, and spirals.”

Tribes long throughout history regarded Bainbridge Island, and Alkai beach as sacred ceremony grounds, and burial ground for their tribal elders.

When white man came, it was they and the japanese that moved into Bainbridge island, (priorly uninhabited by any humans), and created the Port Blakely Mill, which soon became the biggest lumber mill in the world and was responsible to processing and shipping out all the lumber that was cut down in that region. Is it any surprise that this mill fell right above the geological path of the fault line?